Visualizzazione post con etichetta Impressionism Art. Mostra tutti i post
Visualizzazione post con etichetta Impressionism Art. Mostra tutti i post
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Pierre-Auguste Renoir at the Clark Art Institute

Pierre-Auguste Renoir | Bouquet of Roses, 1879

In the summer of 1879, the banker and diplomat Paul Berard invited Pierre-Auguste Renoir to his country house in Normandy.
During his visit, the artist painted portraits of Berard’s children and made several panel decorations, this one for a door in the library.
While the bouquet’s orderly arrangement is traditional, the thick brushstrokes and lively colors reflect Renoir’s Impressionist technique. | Source: © The Clark Art Institute

Pierre-Auguste Renoir | Bouquet of Roses, 1879 | The Clark Art Institute

Nell'estate del 1879, il banchiere e diplomatico Paul Berard invitò Renoir nella sua casa di campagna in Normandia.
Durante la sua visita, l'artista dipinse ritratti dei figli di Berard e realizzò diverse decorazioni su tavola, questa per una porta della biblioteca.
Mentre la disposizione ordinata del bouquet è tradizionale, le spesse pennellate ed i colori vivaci riflettono la tecnica impressionista di Renoir. | Fonte: © Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

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Ken Moroney | Impressionist painter

Ken Moroney (1949-2018) was born in South London. Of Anglo Irish parentage, his father was typical of his generation and worried about Ken’s artistic temperament which he viewed as effeminate.
As a result Ken took up boxing and won a gold medal for South London in his teens.
His art continued to flourish with his trademark striking use of colour. His main medium is oils and he favours romantic subjects of Edwardian times.
Stylistically Moroney’s work surely emanates from the French Post-Impressionist tradition and his subject matter and bright palette can be compared to similar beach scenes created by the likes of Eugène Boudin.


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Claude Monet | Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe, 1865-1866

From: Musée d’Orsay, Paris
This fragment, there is a second also in the Musée d'Orsay, is one of the remaining parts of the monumental Luncheon on the Grass by Monet. The work was started in the spring of 1865 and measured over four metres by six. It was intended to be both a tribute and a challenge to Manet whose painting of the same title had been the subject of much sarcasm from the public as well as the critics when it was exhibited in the Salon des Refusés in 1863. But the project was abandoned in 1866, just before the Salon where Monet intended to show it, opened.

In 1920, the painter himself recounted what had happened to the picture: "I had to pay my rent, I gave it to the landlord as security and he rolled it up and put in the cellar. When I finally had enough money to get it back, as you can see, it had gone mouldy". Monet got the painting back in1884, cut it up, and kept only three fragments. The third has now disappeared.


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Pierre-Auguste Renoir at the Museum Barberini

Pierre-Auguste Renoir | The Pear Tree, 1877

In the early 1860s Pierre-Auguste Renoir had studied in the Paris atelier of Swiss history painter Charles Gleyre.
Together with his fellow pupils Frédéric Bazille, Claude Monet and Alfred Sisley, he belonged to the nucleus of the group that would become known as Impressionists in the mid-1870s.
Renoir’s early experiments with painting in the open air were decisive for the development of his visual language. In a departure from traditional methods, he worked en plein air not merely for studies, but also, like Monet, in order to create independent, finished works.


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Childe Hassam | Geraniums, 1888-1889

From: Christie's
Following a successful career in Boston, in 1886 the celebrated American Impressionist Childe Hassam (1859-1935) journeyed to Paris with his wife Maud where he would remain until 1889.
During this time in the summer months, the Hassams visited the country home of German businessman Ernest Blumenthal and his wife, who was friends with Mrs. Hassam, in Villiers-Le-Bel, a small town ten miles northeast of Paris in the Val d’Oise.


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Camille Pissarro at the Museum Barberini

Camille Pissarro | Boulevard Montmartre, Twilight, 1897

In a series of fourteen paintings Camille Pissarro focused on the Boulevard Montmartre in the center of Paris.
From his room in the Grand Hôtel de Russie, with the opera building behind him, he had a view of the busy street on which twenty thousand carriages rattled by every day, past the expensive shops and the popular Café Tortoni.
This picture shows the boulevard with fresh green trees in springtime. | Source: © Museum Barberini


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Pierre-Auguste Renoir | Champ de bananiers, 1881

Starting in 1881 the art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel regularly bought paintings from Pierre-Auguste Renoir.
The painter then undertook all the trips he had previously been unable to afford and which would complete his artistic training.
His first trip took him to Algeria, in the footsteps of Delacroix whom he admired. Renoir's visual experience there was as intense as it had been for the older artist.
Seduced by the colours and the "incredible wealth" of nature here, he produced several pure landscapes, quite rare in his oeuvre. This field of banana trees is in the Essai garden in Hamma, created in 1832 in Algiers.


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Thomas Dewing | Lady in Yellow, 1888

Thomas Wilmer Dewing (1851-1938) created a striking contrast between the precisely modeled face and arms, and the very free, feathery brushstrokes of the dress.

The painting was exhibited in 1888 at the Boston Art Club, where it was purchased by Isabella Stewart Gardner with the help of Dennis Miller Bunker.
The painting was then exhibited to considerable acclaim at the National Academy of Design and at the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889.
Stanford White designed the frame, which is original to the painting. Mrs. Gardner hung the painting in the Yellow Room, a setting perfectly attuned to the hue of the woman’s dress. | Source: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Thomas Wilmer Dewing | Lady in Yellow, 1888 | Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum