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Cheri Blum (1969-2003)


An artist who celebrated beauty in imperfection. These kinds of simple contradictions were Cheri Blum’s trademarks and perhaps the key to her remarkable success.
Cheri Blum who was born in Maryland on 1969 and passed away at her home in Georgetown on November 4, 2003, at the age of 34. In her brilliant but brief career, Cheri Blum created more than 400 original paintings. Cheri Blum began her careeas an illustrator and muralist, creating trompe l’oeil, faux painting and decorative furniture finishes. This background not only provided her with the techniques she used to create her beautiful, unique backgrounds, but also a strong desire to bring art into everyday life. “We should be able to surround ourselves with beautiful art in our homes and offices, not just when we visit museums and galleries”.
Cheri’s approach was inspired by the past, but reflected today’s modern styles. She strove to create art that was peaceful, tranquil and edited of unnecessary detail. The simple, graceful shapes she painted have a timeless quality and restful feeling that make them easy to live with and enjoy.

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

When asked about her sources of inspiration, Cheri said: “I believe we find inspiration everywhere, in objects that intrigue us, deep within ourselves, and in unexpected places. Some of the great painters of the past, like John LaFarge and William Morris, were able to create timeless art for the walls, and yet also enjoyed great success in the field of industrial and home design. These artists inspire me, and have helped pave the way to achieving my goals”.
Until her untimely death in November 2003, Cheri worked in her studio along the banks of the Sassafras River in the Chesapeake Bay area of Maryland. “I am truly grateful to be able to make a living doing something that gives me so much satisfaction”, said Cheri.

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Faux painting or faux finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. The naming comes from the french word faux, meaning false, as these techniques started as a form of replicating materials such as marble and wood with paint, but has subsequently come to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture.
Faux finishing has been used for millennia, from cave painting to the tombs of ancient Egypt, but what we generally think of as faux finishing in the decorative arts began with plaster and stucco finishes in Mesopotamia over 5000 years ago.
Faux painting became popular in classical times in the forms of faux marble, faux wood, and trompe l'oeil murals.
Artists would apprentice for 10 years or more with a master faux painter before working on their own. Great recognition was awarded to artists who could actually trick viewers into believing their work was the real thing. Faux painting has continued to be popular throughout the ages, but experienced major resurgences in the neoclassical revival of the nineteenth century and the Art Deco styles of the 1920s.

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

During the recent history of decorative painting, faux finishing has been mainly used in commercial and public spaces.
In the late 1980s and early 1990s, faux finishing saw another major revival, as wallpaper began to fall out of fashion.
At this point, faux painting became extremely popular in home environments, with high-end homes leading the trend. While it can be quite expensive to hire a professional faux finisher, many faux painting methods are simple enough for a beginning home owner to create with a little instruction. People are also attracted to the simplicity of changing a faux finish, as it can be easily painted over compared with the hassle of removing wallpaper.
In modern day faux finishing, there are two major materials/processes used. Glaze work involves using a translucent mixture of paint and glaze applied with a brush, roller, rag, or sponge, and often mimics textures, but it is always smooth to the touch. Plaster work can be done with tinted plasters, or washed over with earth pigments, and is generally applied with a trowel or spatula. The finished result can be either flat to the touch or textured.

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting

Cheri Blum 1969-2003 | Faux painting


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