Visualizzazione post con etichetta Art history. Mostra tutti i post
Visualizzazione post con etichetta Art history. Mostra tutti i post
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Cristo Redentore (Rio De Janeiro, 1931)


La statua del Cristo Redentore di Rio de Janeiro è uno dei monumenti più conosciuti al mondo. Il monumento, alto circa 39.6 metri, raffigura un grande Gesù Cristo dalle braccia aperte, a simboleggiare il calore e l'accoglienza del popolo brasiliano verso i visitatori.
Situato sulla montagna del Corcovado, all'interno del Parco Nazionale di Tijuca, sorge proprio sulla cima del monte, a più di 700 metri sul livello del mare, a picco sulla città e sulla baia di Rio de Janeiro, è alta 38 metri, di cui 8 metri fanno parte del basamento, in posizione dominante rispetto alla città.
Dall'alto della sua posizione si apre una splendida veduta sul panorama circostante, che comprende la città di Rio de Janeiro con la sua baia. Da qui sono inoltre visibili il Pan di Zucchero e la Baia di Guanabara e Niteròi, così come le spiagge di Copacabana, di Ipanema e la Laguna Rodrigo de Freitas.



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Genre painting




Vincent van Gogh | The reaper after Millet, 1889

Genre painting (or petit genre), a form of genre art, depicts aspects of everyday life by portraying ordinary people engaged in common activities.
One common definition of a genre scene is that it shows figures to whom no identity can be attached either individually or collectively - thus distinguishing petit genre from history paintings (also called grand genre) and portraits.
A work would often be considered as a genre work even if it could be shown that the artist had used a known person - a member of his family, say - as a model.
In this case it would depend on whether the work was likely to have been intended by the artist to be perceived as a portrait - sometimes a subjective question.
The depictions can be realistic, imagined, or romanticized by the artist. Because of their familiar and frequently sentimental subject matter, genre paintings have often proven popular with the bourgeoisie, or middle class.


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Ancient Buddhism and Buddhist Art


Buddha, Probably Amitabha Amituofo | Early 7th century | China | Metropolitan Museum of Art

The history of Buddhism spans from the 6th century BCE to the present. Buddhism arose in the eastern part of Ancient India, in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha (now in Bihar, India), and is based on the teachings of Siddhārtha Gautama.
The religion evolved as it spread from the northeastern region of the Indian subcontinent through Central, East, and Southeast Asia. At one time or another, it influenced most of the Asian continent.
The history of Buddhism is also characterized by the development of numerous movements, schisms, and schools, among them the Theravāda, Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna traditions, with contrasting periods of expansion and retreat.


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Ancient | Greek sculpture


The origins of greek sculpture have been ascribed the wooden cult statues that were described by Pausanias as xoana. No such statue survives, and the descriptions of them are vague despite the fact that some were objects of veneration for hundreds of years. The first piece of Greek statuary to be reassembled since is probably the Lefkandi Centaur (Eretria Mus.) found on Euboia. This terra cotta statue of circa 900 BC was constructed in parts before being dismembered and buried in two separate graves. Greeks made art to show how wonderful, and beautiful the gods and goddesses are. It seeks an intentional mark on its knee - it has been postulated that this indicates that the statue represents Cheiron and the wound from Herakles' arrow. If so, it would be the earliest known depiction of myth in Greek History.

Ancient | Greek sculpture
The forms from the geometrical period, ca. 900 to 700 BC, were chiefly terracotta figurines, bronzes and ivories. The bronzes are chiefly tripod cauldrons and freestanding figures or groups. Such bronzes were made using the lost-wax technique probably introduced from Syria and are almost entirely votive offerings left at the Hellenistic civilization Panhellenic sanctuaries of Olympia, Delos and Delphi. These were manufactured elsewhere and a number of local styles may be identified by finds from Athens, Argos and Sparta. Typical works of the era include the Karditsa warrior -Athens Br. 12831, and the many examples of the equestrian statuette. The repertory of this bronze work is not confined to standing men and horses however, as with the vase painting of the time we also find stags, birds, beetles, hares, griffins and lions. There are no inscriptions on early to middle geometric sculpture until the appearance of the Mantiklos "Apollo" -Boston 03.997, of the early 7th century found in Thebes. This is a standing figure of a man with an almost daedalic form with the legend "Mantiklos offers me as a tithe to Apollo of the silver bow; do you, Phoibos, give some pleasing favour in return" across his thighs in hexameter verse. Apart from the novelty of recording its own purpose this sculpture it adapts the formulae of oriental bronzes as seen in the shorter more triangular face and slightly advancing left leg. This is sometimes seen as anticipating the greater expressive freedom of the 7th century and as such the Mantiklos figure is referred to in some quarters as proto-daedalic. Later in the 1900s Greek sculpture was still bronze casts. Greek sculptures were very detailed and decorative.

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture

Ancient | Greek sculpture